Monday, July 6, 2015

"Lex credendi, lex vivendi: A response to Laudato Si’" by Ilia Delio,... Church Must Live Message of Interrelatedness and Inclusivity

"The Power of One" From the Radical Christian Life by Sister Joan Chittister OSB

The Power of One

In the sixth century, Benedict of Nursia was an aspiring young student at the center of the empire with all the glitz and glamour, all the fading glory and dimming power that implied.

Rome had overspent, overreached, and overlooked the immigrants on the border who were waiting—just waiting—to pour through the system like a sieve.

Rome—ROME!—the invincible, had been sacked. As in the book of Daniel, the writing was on the wall, but few, if anyone, read it.

In our own world, the headlines are in our paper, too, and few, if any, are reading them.


St. Benedict
Feast Day July 11
But in the sixth century, one person, this young man, resolved to change the system not by confronting it, not by competing with it to be bigger, better, or more successful but by eroding its incredible credibility.

This one single person in the sixth century—without the money, the technology, the kind of systemic support our age considers so essential to success and therefore uses to explain its failure to make a difference—simply refused to become what such a system modeled and came to have a major influence in our own time.

This one person simply decided to change people’s opinions about what life had to be by himself living otherwise, by refusing to accept the moral standards around him, by forming other people into organized communities to do the same: to outlaw slavery where they were; to devote themselves to the sharing of goods; to commit themselves to care for the earth; to teach and model a new perspective on our place in the universe.

And on his account—though numbers, history attests, were never his criteria for success—thousands more did the same age after age after age.

Through it all, for over 1500 years, Benedictine communities—small, local, and autonomous—worked in creative ways to meet the needs of the areas in which they grew, struggling always to shape and balance a deep and communal spiritual life with the great social needs around them.

If the twenty-first century needs anything at all, it may well be a return to the life-giving, radical vision of Benedict. Perhaps we need a new reverence for bold Benedictine wisdom if civilization is to be saved again—and this time the very planet preserved.

—from The Radical Christian Life by Joan Chittister (Liturgical Press)

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Pope Francis Encyclical: "Laudato Si", Response by Jeni Marie Marcus, Esq. and Deacon ARCWP: Encyclical Needed on Women as Spiritual Equals

http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

14. "I urgently appeal, then, for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all. The worldwide ecological movement has already made considerable progress and led to the establishment of numerous organizations committed to raising awareness of these challenges. Regrettably, many efforts to seek concrete solutions to the environmental crisis have proved ineffective, not only because of powerful opposition but also because of a more general lack of interest. Obstructionist attitudes, even on the part of believers, can range from denial of the problem to indifference, nonchalant resignation or blind confidence in technical solutions. We require a new and universal solidarity. As the bishops of Southern Africa have stated: “Everyone’s talents and involvement are needed to redress the damage caused by human abuse of God’s creation”. [22] All of us can cooperate as instruments of God for the care of creation, each according to his or her own culture, experience, involvements and talents."


23. The climate is a common good, belonging to all and meant for all. At the global level, it is a complex system linked to many of the essential conditions for human life. A very solid scientific consensus indicates that we are presently witnessing a disturbing warming of the climatic system. In recent decades this warming has been accompanied by a constant rise in the sea level and, it would appear, by an increase of extreme weather events, even if a scientifically determinable cause cannot be assigned to each particular phenomenon. Humanity is called to recognize the need for changes of lifestyle, production and consumption, in order to combat this warming or at least the human causes which produce or aggravate it. It is true that there are other factors (such as volcanic activity, variations in the earth’s orbit and axis, the solar cycle), yet a number of scientific studies indicate that most global warming in recent decades is due to the great concentration of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen oxides and others) released mainly as a result of human activity. Concentrated in the atmosphere, these gases do not allow the warmth of the sun’s rays reflected by the earth to be dispersed in space. The problem is aggravated by a model of development based on the intensive use of fossil fuels, which is at the heart of the worldwide energy system. Another determining factor has been an increase in changed uses of the soil, principally deforestation for agricultural purposes.
24. Warming has effects on the carbon cycle. It creates a vicious circle which aggravates the situation even more, affecting the availability of essential resources like drinking water, energy and agricultural production in warmer regions, and leading to the extinction of part of the planet’s biodiversity. The melting in the polar ice caps and in high altitude plains can lead to the dangerous release of methane gas, while the decomposition of frozen organic material can further increase the emission of carbon dioxide. Things are made worse by the loss of tropical forests which would otherwise help to mitigate climate change. Carbon dioxide pollution increases the acidification of the oceans and compromises the marine food chain. If present trends continue, this century may well witness extraordinary climate change and an unprecedented destruction of ecosystems, with serious consequences for all of us. A rise in the sea level, for example, can create extremely serious situations, if we consider that a quarter of the world’s population lives on the coast or nearby, and that the majority of our megacities are situated in coastal areas.'

"A Follow Up Game Changing Encyclical" by Jennifer Marie Marcus, Esq., Deacon, ARCWP


 Undoubtedly, Francis's encyclical " Laudato Si [Praised Be]: On the Care of Our Common Home" is historic and will have an impact on the global community and its economy. The encyclical's emphasis on how climate change has a direct negative  impact on the global poor is laudatory and apparent.

 Since the global poor are  comprised of primarily  women and children ,if Francis is really serious about making significant inroads into  eradicating poverty it would behoove him to issue  a follow up historic encyclical  elevating the status and role of women commencing with taking action  in his own Church. He could start by placing women in leadership roles and recognizing their Divine call to Holy Orders and the Episcopate. This would be sign to the rest of the world that women are, according to scripture, equal to men in source divinity and it would be consistent with the Vatican II Documents. 

The encyclical should state  in clear unequivocal terms that because women are equal children in the eyes of our Creator they can no longer be  morally ,culturally, and legally viewed as subservient to men ,nor are they property ,or second class citizens.. Women are to be  treated with dignity and respect ,have wage parity with men for the same work they perform and are to be  free of practices and laws that are misogynistic, patriarchal, bigoted , discriminatory  oppressive and  result in all forms of emotional and physical violence. Behavior, actions or laws falling short of those prohibitions would be viewed as grave sins .

It is my belief that such an encyclical would challenge backward cultures, secular and religious institutions and governments to improve the lives of women and reduce the number of poverty stricken peoplein the world. At the minimum it would invite serious global discourse of the scourge of gender inequality and its connection to poverty, misogyny, patriarchal oppression, discrimination and violence, and overtime be a  segue for positive social change and justice.

www.arcwp.org


Vigil Outside Detention Center in Richmond County, California, July 4, 2015, Silvia Brandon-Perez ARCWP

Vigil against the detention of migrant
July 4, 2015, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
West Detention Centre County
5555 Giant Highway, Richmond, CA

We dedicate esta vigil Jim Forsyth, WHO passed from this life on July 4, 2013, and our vigils and meetings Attended STI since inception. Brother Jim Forsyth, present!
WELCOME - BRANDON SILVIA PEREZ, WIDOW OF FORSYTH
Most of us know the story of a child born in a poor family in a village forgotten in occupied land. A family forced to flee persecution to seek asylum in a neighboring country like many others of "illegal aliens" called; a family living the life of the poor, the anawim. The boy Become a man, speaking on Behalf of the poor and against the excesses of the empire, tortured and murdered as a political criminal. Today we are experiencing the excesses of the empire Perhaps as never before, torturing and killing With new technology, but always with the approval of the state, Which justifies our actions With the seal of the "law." It is time to turn the tables and rid our world of the merchants of greed and death for our witness not constant violent.

Psalm 121
I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills
                              Where Does My Help Come From?
My help cometh from the Lord,
Which made ​​heaven and earth
.

I invite everyone to briefly introduce Themselves.

Exodus 2
A man of the house of Levi married a Levite woman. The woman Became pregnant and had a are. She saw how beautiful it was and hid him for three months. When She Could not hide it any longer, she Took a basket made ​​of papyrus plants and covered with tar and pitch. She put the baby in it and it Placed Among the papyrus plants near the river Nile. Pharaoh's daughter opened the basket, looked at the baby and saw he was a child. She was crying, and she felt sorry for him. She said: "This is one of the Hebrew children . "

Today, women and men of other banks are sending children away to save Their Their Lives. They come to Us with security and food cravings and love of foreigners.

 1 Kings 8: 41-43
As for the foreigner Who is not of your people Israel, come from a distant land Because of your name  (for They Shall hear of your great name and your strong hand and your outstretched arm), and come and pray Toward this house,  you You hear in heaven, in your dwelling place, and do all for Which ACCORDING to the foreigner calls to you,
. If a stranger sojourn with you in your land, do not oppress him  as one born Among You That You Shall the stranger dwelleth with you, and You Shall love him as yourself; for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. I am the Lord your God . Leviticus 19: 33-34
Anthem: Here I am, Lord

Now let's hear Carolyn Scarr recite His beautiful poem about the immigration interview, more than 2000 years ago That poor family. The text of the poem is on our songs.

Young Iris speaks for July 4:
Thank you all for coming to the eve of the July 4 - the day of the independence of esta nation. The USA. is proud of freedom, liberty and justice for all, but today, we wonder - justice for Whom? Listening to These testimonies, we will Consider Often These narratives have, but are not really Often Heard. I ask That we be Able to hear With our ears, minds and hearts to see the ways in These unjust immigration laws Which Have Affected the people of our community, Because When a body part hurts, we all hurt.

The poem The New Colossus, Emma Lazarus inscribed permanently into the basis of the Statue of Liberty, we remember on This July 4th:

Not like the mythical Greek giant bronze,
With conquering astride from land to land members;
. Here in our sunset gates it was drenched yerguerá
A mighty woman with a torch, Whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name.
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The twin cities frame the air-bridged harbor
"Beware, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" gritfa her.
"Give me your tired, your poor,
your huddled masses yearning to breathe free
, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore
Send These, the homeless, tempest-tost to me
I lift my lamp beside the golden door! "

Jake shares with us about the movement of pride ("Pride") and LGBTQ people and the detention of migrants, WHO suffer double humiliation for Their positions.

Responsorial reading based on the declaration of the rights of migrants from Annunciation House in El Paso, Texas
L: We are a nation of immigrants. We Gathered from the four corners of the earth.
A: We come from Mexico and the Philippines, from Central America, Ireland, Ethiopia and Iraq. We come to escape poverty and violence, fear, war, discrimination, political repression and economic hardship .
L: We leave to parents and children, and the heavens of Our Countries. We bring with us languages, pictures, phone numbers, backpacks, stories and hopes.
A: We walked day and night across the desert to cross the border. We Waited on the other side for the papers to cross. We jumped on trains, seen comrades fall, We have put our trust in coyotes and we Have Been abandoned by smugglers of Human Beings. Have we are what we eat .
L: We Have Been called illegal, wet, foreigners and terrorists. They surround us at work, leaving our homeless children. We are imprisoned and Deported from the cities in Which We have lived for decades.
A: We are math teachers and dishwashers, carpenters, translators, portrait artists and houses. We pick apples in Yakima, Washington. We wash dishes in restaurants in Minnesota. We rebuild homes in Louisiana to Hurricane Katrina. Taxes paid our salaries .
L: We send our children to school, wanting to learn and succeed and be safe. Nor do we forget the family members That Remain in Our Countries of birth: work hard to keep them as well. In some places, we are invisible. But look for us, Because we are here. We are some twelve million.
R : We bring our work, our children, the rich textures of our cultures, and an opportunity for each of us, That is us and you, learn compassion and wisdom through met the stranger. We Should no longer be strangers .
All are your grandparents and your sons and daughters, Their past and Their future. As brothers and sisters in Christ, we affirm our humanity, dignity and courage. As children of one God, as heirs of the same land, we affirm our rights.

FURTHER READING:
We are a diverse group of people of many faiths, colors, creeds, lands. All sacred books constrain us to welcome the stranger among us.

"[Lord,] When we see you a stranger and Took thee in?" The King will reply, 'I tell you, whatever you did for one of the Least of These my brethren, you did it to me. "
Matthew 25: 38, 40

"Be not forgetful to entertain strangers, for by so doing some Have unwittingly entertained angels."
Hebrews 13: 2

" You, my brothers, Were called to freedom; only do not use liberty as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another.    For all the law in one word is brilliant: You Shall love your neighbor as yourself
Galatians 5: 13-14
"... You are no longer strangers and sojourners, but fellow Citizens With the saints and members of God's family."

Ephesians 2: 11-21
"And Those Who Have dignity and comfort Among You not swear not to give to relatives and the needy and Refugees in the cause of God. That forgive and show indulgence . "

The Surat an-Nur Noble Quran 24:22
"And do good to your parents and close relatives, and the orphans and the needy, and the neighbor from Among your own people, and the neighbor Who is a stranger, and the friend by your side, and the wayfarer, and Those Who legitimately POSSESS. Verily, Allah does not like any of Those Who, full of vanity, acts in a boastful way ... "

Quran An-Nisa 4:36
"Those Who Believed, and ADOPTED exile, and Fought for the Faith, With Their property and Their persons, in the cause of Allah and Those Who gave them asylum and help are all friends and protectors, one of another."
Al Anfal Koran 8:72

Prayers from abroad to abroad abroad (the Tikkun Community)
Oh God, remind us That we are part of a whole or part of the land of our ancestors and your future, Have We both borders or we do not,  we are  national and transnational, injured and uninjured. Let us be Citizens of a world Where love and respect are just borders. Amen.

Please the Spirit and the forces That created the world. No matter if our tradition Began With The God of Abraham, Isaac and Sarah, or of Ishmael and Hagar, or immigrants to the manger or manifestation as deep as the longing of the heart to Understand, still, hear our prayer for the displaced and out of place. We are Both hosts and guests, strangers and friends, in a shrinking world That Has Its source in you. Unite us in the arts of hospitality and mutual understanding. Amen.

Continue walking through the kindness of strangers, and help us make sure we know Who is whos abroad. Teach us to think globally from the safety of our own backyard - so we can learn to be truly safe. Amen

Prayer for our immigrant brothers and sisters, of Pax Christi

Blessed are You, Lord Jesus Christ.
Crossed all borders
Between divinity and humanity
to make your home with us.
Help us in welcoming newcomers,
Migrants and Refugees.

Blessed are You, God of all nations.
Bless our rich land
With the goods of creation
And Those made in your image.
Help us to be good stewards and builders of peace,
live as your children.

Blessed are You, Holy Spirit.
Work in the hearts of all
to Achieve harmony and goodwill.
Strengthen us to welcome them to the
other lands, cultures, religions,
so we can live in human solidarity
and hope.

God of all men, grant us the vision
to see your presence among us,
Especially in our migrant brothers and sisters.
Give us courage to open the door to our neighbors
and grace to build a society of justice.

Song: Peace and freedom

• Testimony of anyone Who wants to share experiences of immigration detention

• The prayers of the people to be answered by: Lord, hear our prayer

• Noise

Closing Hymn: Amazing Grace

This vigil was presented by the Ecumenical Institute for Peace and the South Hayward Parish, with the help of our musicians, Patti Connors, Joseph Daniel Pinell, Zwiekel Daniel ben Avram and I, and the collaboration of interns EBASE / FAME, David Iris and Jake . Thanks to All Who Attended!






Itinerary for Pope Francis' United States Visit, ARCWP To Ordain 3 Women Bishops In Philadelphia!

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/vatican-pope-francis-itinerary-trip-americas/
Like Pope Francis, The Association of Roman Catholic Women Priests is making history as we prepare to ordain 3 women bishops in the Philadelphia area during the Pope's historic visit, contact Janice Sevre-Duszynska rhythmsofthedance1@gmail.com or Bridget Mary Meehan at sofiabmm@aol.com


Why Stay in the Roman Catholic Church? My Response: Sacraments, Mysticism and Justice

A friend of the Roman Catholic Women Priests Movement asked today Why do Roman Catholic Women Priests stay in an institutional Church that rejects us? 
My response is:  
1. Our movement is prophetic. We are crying out in the darkness and healing the wound of misogyny. All  the baptized celebrate sacraments and women are worthy by our creation in God's image to preside at the altar. Until women priests are affirmed in the institutional church, the cancer of sexism will eat away at the heart of the church. The people of God are the church, not just the Vatican or hierarchy, and millions support women's ordination. 
2. As an issue of justice, women must be equals in every area of leadership in the church because we are half of the membership, and this includes liturgical leadership as deacons, priests and bishops.
3. The Roman Catholic Church has a rich and beautiful mystical, sacramental and social justice tradition that is our birthright as equal members by our baptism..
4. This is our family and we are not leaving our family, even though it is dysfunctional! We love the church and are working to renew it according to the example Jesus in the Gospels. We are a holy shakeup and we are not giving up! Bridget Mary Meehan, ARCWP, www.arcwp.org

The photo below was taken by Jamie Kay, a friend of my dear friend Rick Sapp at his wedding to Nancy. It was a honor to officiate at this wedding in the Baltimore metro area. Rick is now in Hospice and I ask your prayers for him, Nancy, Katie, Robin and family. 

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Mary Mother of Inclusive Catholic Community Celebrates Liturgy on 4th of July in Sarasota, Fl. , Co-Presiders Lee Breyer and Bridget Mary Meehan, ARCWP

left to right:Lee Breyer and Bridget Mary Meehan, Co-Preside with MMOJ Community
Marilyn Jenai, Janet Blakely, Sherry Robertson, Sally Brochu
Kevin and Judy Connelly , Kevin shares during Dialogue homily

Lee Breyer, Bridget Mary Meehan, Marilyn Jenai pray Eucharistic Prayer







Friday, July 3, 2015

"Be Prophetic" A Homily for 14th Sunday of July, 2014 by Judy Lee, RCWP

https://judyabl.wordpress.com/2015/07/03/be-prophetic-a-rc-woman-priests-homily-for-the-fourteenth-sunday-in-ot-july-52015/

Immigrant Detention Vigil by Silvia Brandon Pérez, ARCWP


July 4, 2015, 11am-12pm
West County Detention Facility
5555 Giant Highway, Richmond, CA

This vigil is dedicated to Jim Forsyth, who passed from this life on July 4th, 2013, and who attended our vigils and meetings from their inception.  Jim Forsyth, presente!

Welcome – Bienvenida – Silvia Brandon Pérez

Most of us know the story of a child born to a poor family in a forgotten village in occupied land. A family forced to flee persecution, seeking asylum in a neighboring country as so many other so-called “illegal aliens;” a family living the life of the poor, the anawîm. The child, grown to be a man, speaking for the poor and against the excesses of empire, tortured and killed as a political criminal.  Today we are experiencing the excesses of empire as perhaps never before, torturing and killing with new technology, but always with the approval of the state, justifying our deeds with the seal of the so-called “law.”  It is time to turn the tables and rid our world of the merchants of greed and death by our constant nonviolent witness. 

·        Psalm 121

I look up to the mountains;
    does my strength come from mountains?
No, my strength comes from God,
    who made heaven, and earth, and mountains.

·        I welcome all of you who have come to this event to a very short introduction.


·        Exodus 2 

A man from Levi’s family married a Levite woman.  The woman became pregnant and had a son. She saw how beautiful he was and hid him for three months. When she couldn’t hide him any longer, she took a basket made of papyrus plants and coated it with tar and pitch. She put the baby in it and set it among the papyrus plants near the bank of the Nile River. Pharaoh’s daughter opened the basket, looked at the baby, and saw it was a boy. He was crying, and she felt sorry for him. She said, “This is one of the Hebrew children.”
Today, women and men from other shores are sending their children away to save their lives.  They come to us, wanting safety and food and the love of the stranger. 

·        1 Kings 8:41-43
We are like foreigners, O God, who have come from a distant land because of your great name, because of your mighty hand, your outstretched arm.  Enfold us now, O God, not as strangers, but as beloved children. Amen.
"When strangers sojourn with you in your land, you shall do them no wrong, the strangers who sojourn with you shall be to you as natives among you, and you love them as yourself; for you were strangers in the land of Egypt."  —Leviticus 19:33-34
Hymn: Here I Am, Lord

Now we will hear Carolyn Scarr recite her beautiful poem about the immigration interview, more than 2000 years ago, of that poor family.  The text of the poem is in our song sheet.

·        Sharing by Iris on the fourth of July:

Thank you all for coming to this morning’s vigil on the 4th of July - the day of this nation’s independence. The US prides itself in freedom, liberty, and justice for all, but today, we ask ourselves - justice for whom? As we listen to these testimonies, let’s keep in mind that these narratives are often told, but not often really heard. My prayer is that we be able to listen with our ears, minds, and hearts to the ways these unjust immigration laws have affected those in our community, because when one part of the body hurts, we all hurt.

·         The poem The New Colossus, by Emma Lazarus, stands permanently inscribed in the Statue of Liberty, which we remember on this 4th of July:

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"


·        Sharing by Jake: Pride & LGBTQ immigrant detention

·        From the Responsive reading based on the DECLARATION OF IMMIGRANT RIGHTS from Annunciation House, El Paso, TX
L:      We are a nation of immigrants. We come together from the four corners of the earth.
R:      We come from Mexico and the Philippines, from Central America, Ireland, Ethiopia and Iraq. We come to escape poverty and violence, fear, war, discrimination, political suppression and economic hardship.
L:      We leave behind parents and children and the skies of our homelands. We bring with us languages, photographs, telephone numbers, backpacks, stories, and hopes.
R:      We have walked day and night through the desert to cross the frontera. We have waited on the far side for papers to go through. We have hopped trains, seen companions fall, have put our trust in and been abandoned by coyotes—human smugglers. We are the ones who have arrived.
L:      We have been called illegals, mojados, aliens and terrorists. We are rounded up at work, leaving our children stranded. We are imprisoned and deported from the cities where we have lived for decades.
R:      We are math teachers and dishwashers, carpenters, translators, painters of portraits and of houses. We pick the apples in Yakima, Washington. We wash your dishes in restaurants in Minnesota. We rebuild houses in Louisiana in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. We pay taxes out of our salaries.
L:      We send our children to school, wanting them to learn and succeed and to be safe. Neither do we forget the family members we have left in our birth countries: we work hard to support them as well. In some places we are invisible. But look for us—we are here. We are twelve million strong.
R:      We contribute our labor, our children, the rich textures of our cultures, and a chance for each of us—we and you—to learn compassion and wisdom through encountering the stranger. But we must be strangers no longer.
All:     We are your grandparents and your sons- and daughters-in-law, your past and your future. As brothers and sisters in Christ, we affirm our humanity, dignity, and value. As children of one God, as heirs of one earth, we assert our rights. 
ADDITIONAL READINGS:
·        We are a motley crew of people from many faiths, colors, creeds, lands.  All the sacred books constrain us to welcome the stranger in our midst.
"[Lord,] when did we see you a stranger and invite you in?" The King will reply, "I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me."
—Matthew 25: 38, 40
"Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares."
—Hebrews 13:2
"For you were called to freedom, brothers and sisters; only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for self-indulgence, but through love become slaves to one another. For the whole law is summed up in a single commandment, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself."
—Galatians 5:13-14
"...you are no longer strangers and sojourners but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God."
—Ephesians 2:11-21
"And let not those who possess dignity and ease among you swear not to give to the near of kind and to the needy, and to refugees for the cause of God. Let them forgive and show indulgence."
—Qur'an 24:22
"And do good unto your parents, and near of kin, and unto orphans, and the needy, and the neighbour from among your own people, and the neighbor who is a stranger, and the friend by your side, and the wayfarer, and those whom you rightfully possess. Verily, God does not love any of those who, full of self-conceit, act in a boastful manner..."
— Qur'an An-Nisa 4:36
"Those who believed and adopted exile and fought for the Faith, with their property and their persons, in the cause of Allah, as well as those who gave (them) asylum and aid—these are (all) friends and protectors, one of another."
— Qur'an Al Anfal 8:72

Prayers from the Stranger for the Stranger to the Stranger (the Tikkun community)
O God, remind us that we are part of a whole, part of the land or our ancestry and your future, that we are both bordered and unbordered people, national and trans-national, wound and unwound people. Let us be citizens of a globe, where love and respect have just borders. Amen.
We pray to the Spirit and the Forces that created the globe. No matter whether our tradition began with the God of Abraham, Isaac and Sara, or Ishmael and Hagar, or the immigrants standing at the manger, or in a manifestation as deep as the heart’s longing for understanding, still, hear our prayer for the displaced and misplaced. We are each hosts and guests, strangers and friends, on an increasingly small globe that has its source in you. Bind us together in the arts of mutual welcome and understanding. Amen.
Let us get by through the kindness of strangers, and help us make sure we know who the stranger really is. Teach us to think globally from the safety of our own back yard – so that we may learn to be truly safe. Amen
Prayer for Our Immigrant Sisters and Brothers, from Pax Christi

Blessed are You, Lord Jesus Christ.
You crossed every border
between Divinity and humanity
to make your home with us.
Help us to welcome you in newcomers,
migrants and refugees.

Blessed are You, God of all nations.
You bless our land richly
with goods of creation
and with people made in your image.
Help us to be good stewards and peacemakers,
who live as your children.

Blessed are You, Holy Spirit.
You work in the hearts of all
to bring about harmony and goodwill.
Strengthen us to welcome those
from other lands, cultures, religions,
that we may live in human solidarity
and in hope.

God of all people, grant us vision
to see your presence in our midst,
especially in our immigrant sisters and brothers.
Give us courage to open the door to our neighbors
and grace to build a society of justice.
Song: Paz y libertad

·        Witness by any people who want to share experiences of immigration detention

·        Prayers of the people to be answered by:  Lord, hear our prayer

·        Noise

Ending hymn:  Amazing Grace

This vigil was brought to you by the Ecumenical Peace Institute and the South Hayward Parish, with the help of our musicians, Patti Connors,
José Daniel Pinell, Daniel Zwiekel ben Avrám and myself, and the collaboration of EBASE/FAME interns, David, Iris and Jake.  Thank you to all who attended!



"THE GIFT" by Terese Kasper, ARCWP "Blessed are . . . those who mourn: for they will be comforted."



Morning brought mourning
With more in the night.
Sadness and sorrow
Defined my plight.

Deep tears* of the heart
Of everything dear.
Grieving and longing
Segued straight to fear.

Writhing and groaning
Unbearably hurt.
My dark companion
Agony my mate.

Questioning, “Why, why
Just not let me die?”
“Where’s there any good?”
To heaven I’d cry.

Then being quite still
God revealed true grace;
Our hearts in His hands,
Our image Her face.

For love never dies
It’s stronger in death.
Creator gifts us
Our very own breath.

Comfort surpassing
Anything yet known
With heavenly Love
We’re never alone. (*rip, shred )
   

"A Follow Up Game Changing Encyclical" by Jennifer Marie Marcus, Esq., Deacon, ARCWP

 Undoubtedly, Francis's encyclical " Laudato Si [Praised Be]: On the Care of Our Common Home" is historic and will have an impact on the global community and its economy. The encyclical's emphasis on how climate change has a direct negative  impact on the global poor is laudatory and apparent. 

 Since the global poor are  comprised of primarily  women and children ,if Francis is really serious about making significant inroads into  eradicating poverty it would behoove him to issue  a follow up historic encyclical  elevating the status and role of women commencing with taking action  in his own Church. He could start by placing women in leadership roles and recognizing their Divine call to Holy Orders and the Episcopate. This would be sign to the rest of the world that women are, according to scripture, equal to men in source divinity and it would be consistent with the Vatican II Documents. 

The encyclical should state  in clear unequivocal terms that because women are equal children in the eyes of our Creator they can no longer be  morally ,culturally, and legally viewed as subservient to men ,nor are they property ,or second class citizens.. Women are to be  treated with dignity and respect ,have wage parity with men for the same work they perform and are to be  free of practices and laws that are misogynistic, patriarchal, bigoted , discriminatory  oppressive and  result in all forms of emotional and physical violence. Behavior, actions or laws falling short of those prohibitions would be viewed as grave sins .

It is my belief that such an encyclical would challenge backward cultures, secular and religious institutions and governments to improve the lives of women and reduce the number of poverty stricken peoplein the world. At the minimum it would invite serious global discourse of the scourge of gender inequality and its connection to poverty, misogyny, patriarchal oppression, discrimination and violence, and overtime be a  segue for positive social change and justice.




Homily for Holy Spirit Catholic Community, 14th OT, July 5, 2015 by Beverly Bingle, RCWP

At baptism we are marked with oil
as a sign that we are consecrated to God
and anointed by the Spirit as prophets,
just as Jesus was,
so that we might “bring good news to the poor.”
Yes, each of us is called to be a prophet:
a messenger of God’s word.
______________________________________
In today’s reading from Ezekiel God tells the prophet that,
whether people listen or not,
they will know that a prophet has been there.
In the Gospel, Jesus comments
that no prophet is without respect
except at home, with his own kin, and in his native place.
Do people know that we are here,
whether they listen to our message or not?
________________________________________
When the United States declared independence from Great Britain
239 years ago this week,
voting was the privilege of white male landowners.
Slaves were considered property,
not human beings with equal rights and equal dignity.
On June 4, 1843, Isabella Baumfree,
who spoke Dutch but used English as a second language,
told her friends of her prophetic call:
"The Spirit calls me, and I must go," she said.
She changed her name
and left her New York home
to preach about the abolition of slavery.
Isabella Baumfree was a prophet for her time.
She herself had been a slave;
we know her as Sojourner Truth.
It was 84 years after the Declaration of Independence
that the law declared slaves free in the land of the free,
and more than a hundred years more after that
before free people of color
began to find equal protection
under the Voting Rights Act of 1965
and the Civil Rights Act of 1968.
Today, as Michelle Alexander writes in The New Jim Crow:
Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness,
our criminal justice system operates
as a means of enslaving young black men
and insuring their fall to the bottom of our society.
She is a prophet speaking out for what’s right,
standing in a long line of people
who have stood up to the bias and hatred of the status quo,
prophets like Rosa Parks and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
and many lesser known prophets like the Rev. Bruce Klunder,
who was crushed to death by a bulldozer
as he protested the building of a segregated school.
_________________________________________
This past week I was honored to be invited
when Toledo Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson
hosted a Clergy Prayer Breakfast at Warren AME Church,
beginning a conversation about Charleston
and how to make Toledo a place of love
and not a place of hate.
The prayers and speeches were inspiring,
but I remember most two words Rev. Bob Culp spoke
as he talked about the President’s eulogy
for Emanuel AME pastor Clementa Pinckney:
he referred to him as “Pastor Obama.”
And every one of the clergy in that room
understood what he meant:
a prophet is among us, our President himself,
speaking God’s message of grace and forgiveness.
__________________________________________
We know many prophets of equality, some closer to home,
people who stand up and speak out
when they see people treated with indignity or derision
because they are different.
Some of them are local clergy,
like Bob Culp and Karen Shepler and Marty Donnelly.
But most are ordinary people,
like the members of the Dialogue-to-Change group
that is raising money to fund
a WGTE town hall event against racism,
and like the Northwest Ohio folks
who showed so much compassion
that our community came in second in the world
in last year’s Compassion Games.
We know people who are prophets for the planet,
tackling the environmental degradation
that hurts the poorest among us,
the ones on the margins who are already suffering and dying
from the thoughtlessness and waste
of those who have and want more.
We know the famous climate prophets
like Rachel Carson, Al Gore, Thomas Berry, and Pope Francis.
But most are ordinary people,
like families that actually do reduce/reuse/recycle;
and people who make environmentally friendly choices
and work at forming good ecological habits;
and, of course, our Tree Toledo folks.
____________________________________
The most important prophets are right here at home.
In our own words and actions,
we are the ones who speak God’s message
of love and peace and grace.
At the dinner table or in a restaurant,
we talk about current events
and pipe up with our own convictions,
but if we hear hate and bigotry,
we speak out and get it off the table.
On the job, we hear a racist comment and counter it.
When we hear one of the neighborhood kids
teasing someone because they’re different,
or bullying a classmate or a sibling,
or saying something unkind about another kid,
we take them aside and talk to them about it.
Prophets of the Golden Rule, that’s what we are.
I can’t count the number of times
I’ve heard a parent or a grandparent or a teacher ask a child,
“Would you like it if he did that to you?”
______________________________________
Yes, we are called to be prophets.
It’s not always easy, but we can’t hold it in.
We are sent to live God’s message, and we have to do it.

--
Holy Spirit Catholic Community
Saturdays at 4:30 p.m.
Sundays at 5:30 p.m.
at 3925 West Central Avenue (Washington Church)

www.holyspirittoledo.org

Rev. Dr. Bev Bingle, Pastor
Mailing address: 3156 Doyle Street, Toledo, OH 43608-2006
419-727-1774